A thriving Neighborhood in Santa Barbara.

Bound by Garden, Cota, Milpas, Montecito, and Anacapa Streets, the Lagoon District is a unique neighborhood -- poised to experience substantial engagement, visibility and growth among Santa Barbara locals and visitors alike.

An initiative started by many local businesses, the Lagoon District’s goals involve promoting businesses, producing fun events, and enlivening local foot traffic to the Haley Street neighborhood. 

Comprised of various retail, industrial and commercial buildings, the neighborhood diversity and character speaks to its history as an authentic Santa Barbara experience. 

 
 

History of the Lagoon

Santa Barbara's history has inspired the naming of The Lagoon District.  Below are a couple sources, and we would love additional historians to contribute to this site.

From the Santa Barbara Independent 

An article including the stories behind street names Salsipuedes, Laguna, Quarantine and more. The History Behind Street Names

From Walker A. Tomkins "Eastside History"

Throughout the 19th Century the lower Eastside geography was dominated by the “Estero.” This was a salt­crusted dry lake bed most of the time, but in wet winters or when sou’easters howled in off the Channel it became a sheet of brine as far inland as today’s Anapamu Street...

Massive efforts to drain the [sloughs] of the lower Eastside so as to reclaim the fertile acres of the Estero began as early as the 1860s when a ten-block-long canal was dug midway between Salsipuedes and Laguna Streets, from Haley on into the ocean. The unlined ditch silted up very quickly and no trace of it remains except the name “Canal Street.” This was changed to Olive Street in 1922 when the city planted olive trees on either side of the filled-in drainage ditch. Portions of the Eastside are still plagued by winter flooding, especially in the vicinity of Spring Street, and Eastside drainage remains a City Hall problem...

Another long­time junk disposal area was the slowly shrinking bed of the old tidal lagoon. Buried under a mountain of beach sand and rolled flat in 1932, the former dump became Laguna Park, a popular soccer and baseball field where the Los Angeles Dodgers and New York Mets once operated farm clubs in the California League. 

Santa Barbara Historical Museum This map depicts Santa Barbara in 1873 and shows how the lower Eastside used to flood — thus Salsipuedes.

Santa Barbara Historical Museum

This map depicts Santa Barbara in 1873 and shows how the lower Eastside used to flood — thus Salsipuedes.